DISCOVER NATURE – Leafy Sentinels: What Ferns Tell Us About Drought in the Redwoods

Friday, August 19, 2016, 7pm lecture

Open House with light refreshments at 6:30pm
Dwight Center for Conservation Science
$10 suggested donation, students free
No reservations necessary

The height of the most common plant in our redwood forests, the charming Western sword fern, is affected by how much rain and fog accumulate among California’s majestic coast redwood trees.   For this reason, Western sword ferns are an important indicator of climate change. Since 2012, Save the Redwoods League Fern Watch volunteers, including Pepperwood’s own TeenNat interns, have tracked the health of Western sword ferns in more than 100 plots scattered across 11 coast redwood forests in Northern California. These volunteers are helping us paint a picture of how redwood forests are responding to our recent drought. Deborah Zierten, the League’s Education and Interpretation Manager, will share results of their findings and implications for future management of our redwoods.

Deborah Zierten has worked for the National Park Service, KQED, and UC Cooperative Extension creating curriculum and outreach materials relating to the natural history and ecology of the Bay Area. Deborah first became interested in environmental education after working in the rainforests of Ecuador as a forest guide. She has a BS in Biology from the University of Oregon and a MS from Southern Oregon University. Deborah is a Bay Area native and grew up hiking among the redwoods in the East Bay hills.

Arrive at 6:30pm for an open house and check out an exhibit of photos taken by our 2016 TeenNat interns on display in the Dwight Center Gallery.

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2016-08-19 19:00 2016-08-19 21:00 America/Los_Angeles DISCOVER NATURE – Leafy Sentinels: What Ferns Tell Us About Drought in the Redwoods

Friday, August 19, 2016, 7pm lecture Open House with light refreshments at 6:30pm Dwight Center for Conservation Science $10 suggested donation, students free No reservations necessary The height of the most common plant in our redwood forests, the charming Western sword fern, is affected by how much rain and fog accumulate among California’s majestic coast redwood […]

sbeard@pepperwoodpreserve.org