Helping our community protect burned watersheds ahead of winter rains

Helping our community protect burned watersheds ahead of winter rains

Photo Courtesy of the John Burgess/Press Democrat: Pepperwood’s Natural Resource Specialist, Devyn Friedfel (front) assists Bob Miyashiro (center) stake wattles at his residence after it was burned to prevent sedimentation run-off into the watershed.

After the devastating loss of his home of 52 years in the Glass fire, Bob Miyashiro was unaware that he would bear any responsibility for the ruin and runoff beyond his property line at the edge of forested Mark West Creek,” writes Press Democrat correspondent, Mary Callahan in the wake of another devastating fire season.

But in the sprawling burn zones of Sonoma County’s two large wildfires this year, the Glass and Walbridge, watershed watchdogs are trying to get that word out to landowners, stressing the risks for streams and wildlife of debris- and toxic-laden runoff from destructive fires. Miyashiro, 84, got the heads-up from a friend, who told him of a neighborhood workshop Monday meant to help burn zone residents with the materials and know-how to protect local streams.

Pepperwood’s Preserve Management team joined in to help our community with this task.

Read the full article from the Press Democrat here.

Photo Courtesy of the John Burgess/Press Democrat: Installing wattles is important for preventing post-fire toxic runoff into the watershed. Here, volunteers including Pepperwood’s Facilities Assistant and Natural Resource Specialist, Sonja Barringer and Devyn Friedfel, load a pallet of wattles onto the bed of a trailer.

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